TRANSITION TALK

Deal Fatigue - Top Factors for Fatigue and how to Minimize Them

Posted by FP Transitions on Sep 16, 2021 1:01:24 PM

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Wealth management firms seeking rapid growth are increasingly turning to mergers and acquisitions (“M&A”) as a solution.  As such, we are seeing a lot of M&A activity involving firms with multiple owners, staff, and even real property. Many practices are looking to be acquired or merge with a larger business to spur growth, to benefit from economies of scale, to offload compliance and day-to-day operations, to increase bandwidth and offerings to clients, or to assist with the retirement of one or more senior owners/partners, among other reasons. Given these complicating factors, negotiating and documenting these M&A transactions can often be more time consuming than the parties expect, which creates the perfect incubator for deal fatigue.   

Deal fatigue is a condition during negotiations when one or more of the parties begins to feel frustrated, hopeless, irritated, or even angry about the pace of the transaction.  Deal fatigue–at some level–is almost impossible to avoid in a complex transaction, but if caught early and prepared for it can almost always be successfully managed. If not, deal fatigue is one of the surest ways to destroy a transaction. The key is to know the causes and signs of deal fatigue as well as the tools to minimize its negative impact.     

Causes of Deal Fatigue 

There are of course many causes of deal fatigue, but some of the most common ones that we routinely see are: 

  • Time 

Deal fatigue is typically correlated with the time it takes to complete an M&A transaction. Typical transactions take about three months. Parties can get frustrated if they feel like they’re being rushed, while others may feel frustrated if the process starts to feel too drawn out. Striking a balance between the two is important.

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Topics: Selling Your Practice, Acquisition, M&A, Business Value, Deal Structure, Buying & Selling, Mergers

Leveraging the FPT Open-Market Advantage

Posted by FP Transitions on Aug 31, 2021 1:34:12 PM

When it's time to sell your financial advisory practice, knowing the value of your business is just as important as finding the right buyer. But as you begin exploring your options, determining who will be the right buyer to take over your business often takes center stage. The FP Transitions® Open Market will not only locate a new owner who is a good fit for your clients and investment style, but also help you obtain the most value from the sale.

 

Benefits of the FP Transitions Open Market

Tapping into an open marketplace has benefits for both buyers and sellers. Buyers have access to a larger pool of acquisition opportunities with the potential to meet their strategic goals. This includes those outside of their already established network and area, allowing them to expand their reach. And sellers gain access to a large number of qualified buyers in order to find the best possible buyer for their business.

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Topics: Selling Your Practice, Acquisition, Business Value, Buying & Selling

FP Transitions Named Top 10 Valuation Service Companies - CFO Tech Outlook

Posted by FP Transitions on Aug 18, 2021 10:50:48 AM

We're pleased to announce that FP Transitions was named one of CFO Tech Outlook's Top 10 Valuation Service Companies of 2021, recognizing FP Transitions' efforts and placing our team at "the forefront of providing Valuation consulting services and transforming businesses." 

The publication accolades were accompanied by an article: "FP Transitions: Providing Comprehensive Valuation Services," featuring our Ryan Grau, CVA, CBA, Partner and VP of Business Valuation Services. The full text of which can be viewed below or by clicking here.

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Topics: Business Value, FPT in the News, Benchmarking, Valuation & Appraisal

Estimating Value Based on Recurring Revenue

Posted by Ryan Grau CVA, CBA on Jun 7, 2021 2:18:00 PM

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Recurring revenue is one of the most important single determinants of value. Revenue produced through management fees, trails, or renewals is ongoing and reasonably predictable. Transactional revenue is more elusive and difficult to predict. While this isn’t cutting edge news, it is important to understand that recurring revenue is more predictable and presents less risk of future earnings when compared to transactional revenue. As such, when a portion of revenue is generated from transactional revenue, buyers will require a higher rate of return (discount) when compared to other market alternatives that provide more certainty.

Rule of Thumb?

It is important to understand the difference between an adjusted pricing multiple based on the specific characteristics of the business being valued versus a “rule of thumb.” A rule of thumb for the financial services industry is that businesses sell for two-times gross recurring revenue and one-times non-recurring revenue, or that they are worth five-times Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization (EBITDA). Often sellers approach us asking if the offer they have received based on a rule of thumb is sufficient or fair. This question cannot reasonably be answered without understanding the revenue characteristics of the practice.

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Topics: Business Growth, Revenue Strength, Business Value, Multiples

Monitoring the Health of Your Business with Annual Checkups

Posted by Mike McKennon on May 28, 2020 10:57:46 AM

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Completing an annual valuation on your business is the financial service industry equivalent of undergoing your annual physical. I’ll turn 55 this year and I have resigned myself to the fact that prescription medications have officially become their own food group and an annual physical is no longer optional. My annual pilgrimage happens to take place in the spring tucked neatly amongst the sporadic appointments to see specialists for knees, elbows, near sightedness, far sightedness, rotator cuffs and something about my lumbar.

Now, the key word here is annual. If I had my cholesterol checked 10 years ago and then never again how am I going to know if what I am doing is working? An annual examination provides a historical record of your overall health including your vital signs enabling you to make changes in order to perform at your best. The good news is that, unlike my annual physical, your valuation results should get better as your business matures.

Your business is a living, breathing entity. Just like the investments you make on behalf of your clients, it needs to be nurtured, protected, and developed in order to realize its maximum value. It’s important that your valuation be updated annually. The monetary value of your practice is just one of many pieces of information to be gleaned from a professional business valuation.

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Topics: Acquisition, Business Growth, Business Value, Exit Planning, Continuity, Benchmarking

Estimating Value Based on Recurring Revenue

Posted by FP Transitions on Nov 22, 2019 11:35:24 AM

The following is a short excerpt from Estimating Value Based on Recurring Revenue by our VP of Business Valuation Services, Ryan Grau, CVA, CBA.

It is important to understand the difference between an adjusted pricing multiple based on the specific characteristics of the business being valued versus a “rule of thumb.” A rule of thumb for the financial services industry is that businesses sell for two-times gross recurring revenue and one-times non-recurring revenue, or that they are worth five-times Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization (EBITDA). Often sellers approach us asking if the offer they have received based on a rule of thumb is sufficient or fair. This question cannot reasonably be answered without understanding the revenue characteristics of the practice.

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Topics: Business Value, Valuation & Appraisal

Components of a Deal

Posted by Ryan Grau CVA, CBA on Jun 12, 2019 6:00:00 PM

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Whether you are buying or selling, it is important to understand what is being bought and sold and what expectations both the buyer and seller have of each other. Absent these details, it is difficult, if not impossible, to determine if an offer is fair. After all, “fair” is a relative term. The question of fairness would be easy to answer if all deals were done the same way, but the reality is they are not. Nonetheless, there are still common attributes to most deals that can shed light and aid in understanding the underlying terms. This in turn helps both buyer and seller assess the reasonability of an offer. 

WHAT IS BEING BOUGHT AND SOLD?

The sale of many, if not most, financial service businesses are completed as asset sales as opposed to stock sales, where all ownership rights are transferred to a third party. In an asset-based sale, both buyer and seller receive more favorable tax treatment when compared to a stock sale. Since financial services businesses are primarily relationship-based, providing mostly intangible services, what is being sold in an asset sale is rights to a future benefit stream—namely, revenues. However, given the intangible nature of the assets, there is no certainty that a buyer will receive the same amount of revenue from the clients as the seller did. This is why the ability to leverage the seller’s goodwill (the primary asset being bought and sold) to establish proper deal terms that create a shared risk, shared reward scenario become important. 

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Topics: Business Value, Deal Structure, Buying & Selling, Trends in Transactions Study, Transactions

Technology and Value

Posted by Jeremy Seicianu, CVA and Ryan Grau, CVA, CBA on May 14, 2019 11:23:18 AM

Tech and Value

Advisors constantly seek an answer to the questions “How can I grow faster?” and “How can I increase the value of my practice?” Generally, their focus is on acquisition. However, growth and value are not singular concepts. In other words, achieving a rapid pace of growth needs to be tackled through multiple facets, and ultimately, growth will be a driver of value. However, many practices are not adequately equipped to grow at the rates they are striving for. Technology provides many of these opportunities. Investing in technology has a demonstrated relationship to higher growth, more affluent clients, increased profits, and increased value. 

The rapid pace of technological advancement has provided financial advisors more opportunities to reach a broader client base and manage client relationships more effectively and efficiently. By implementing and effectively utilizing web-based advertising, digital conference rooms, client relationship management (CRM) systems, and billing and portfolio management software, advisory practices of all sizes are able to more closely track their performance and focus their efforts on the market segments they wish to target.

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Topics: Business Growth, Business Value, Trends in Transactions Study

Coming Soon! Trends in Transactions and Valuation Study

Posted by FP Transitions on May 2, 2019 2:37:22 PM

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Our new Trends in Transactions and Valuation Study includes expert insight, commentary, and predictions for the state of the financial services industry. The study dives into last year’s M&A numbers and examines how industry businesses and their values have evolved over the last five years.

This comprehensive, 50-page study features:

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Topics: Business Growth, M&A, Business Value

10 Reasons to Professionally Value Your Business

Posted by FP Transitions on Nov 28, 2018 2:08:05 PM

10 Reasons to Professional Value Your Practice

Experienced business owners recognize the importance of tracking and monitoring the value of their practice over time. They know their practice is their most valuable asset, and by valuing it, they are empowered to grow, protect, and realize the value they have built.

Following are ten situations where it’s essential to have a current value and accurate understanding of your business.   

1. Increase Value

To cultivate growth and increase the value of your business, you need to have a starting point—a place to grow from. An accurate and comprehensive valuation will identify value drivers and growth opportunities, allowing you to create an informed growth strategy and make changes that will improve performance. The ability to track those changes and the value of the practice year after year enables you to see your progress and ensure your growth is on target

2. Benchmark Your Business

Tracking your value year after year allows for accurate benchmarking of the business. A thorough benchmarking report will look at your business and compare it to similar-sized businesses in the market, evaluating your company’s standing against the competition. Benchmarking reports reveal how your business stacks up against your peers as well as against leaders in the industry.

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Topics: Succession Planning, Acquisition, Business Growth, Business Value, Benchmarking, Valuation & Appraisal

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