TRANSITION TALK

Creating Collaborators Instead of Competitors

Posted by FP Transitions on Mar 18, 2019 4:38:46 PM

creatingcollaborators_blogbanner

A large percentage of advisory businesses use some form of revenue-sharing arrangements, or an eat-what-you-kill system that rewards sales and production tied to the top line, not the bottom line. This is true of small practices as well as larger businesses. “Fracture lines” are built into the practice model as individual books or practices are built in an environment that starts out collaboratively but most often ends up creating competitors. 

It’s important that independent advisors move away from obsolete practices and improper building tools held over from experiences in the wirehouse world. Creating a sustainable and valuable business should be the goal of every advisor. Building efficiently and effectively takes the proper tools, the proper structure, and the proper team.

Advisors need to embrace the most powerful and lucrative tool they have: equity. Equity is the value of the business separate and apart from the cash flow and compensation paid for work performed.

Read More

Topics: Compensation, Succession Planning, Revenue Sharing, Building Your Team

Reminiscing About the Future : 20 Years in the Making

Posted by David Grau Sr., JD on Aug 27, 2018 7:00:00 PM

Reminiscing About the Future

The foundations for FP Transitions were laid in 1999, and that makes our company officially 20 years old this year. I founded this company thinking that I knew a lot more about running a business than I actually did at the time. Armed with a law school diploma and a lot of energy and drive, I thought I was ready to conquer at least a small corner of the business world. Turns out that running a business takes experience and business knowledge.

Along the way, I picked up an important axiom from a local legend who said, “Don’t confuse activity with achievement.” He was right, but it took me a long time to understand the difference. In retrospect, the first ten years of our company were characterized with a lot of activity; the last ten years is where the achievement took place. The difference maker for us was hiring an outside CEO, Brad Bueermann, to come in and help us turn our activities into achievement on a national scale. Until then, I confused being very busy with being very successful, or at least constantly being on the verge of success. Everything revolved around me and the lawyer in me silently rejoiced. But this wasn’t a good, long-term model because eventually I ran out of time and energy. And I got older!

Advisors often mistake activity for achievement too, thinking that their one-owner practice that is 90% or more fee-based and that grows steadily at 10% or more every year is proof that they have built a business and that success has been achieved. I see a lot of independent advisors building what I call “books” and “practices,” but not very many building sustainable businesses. What I’ve learned over the past twenty years is that, while it is incredibly satisfying to have a practice that revolves around the founder, that isn’t a durable model, and it is not “a business.” At some point, if a practice is to outlive its founder and provide services to the clients for their lifetimes, and not just for the length of the founder’s career, significant changes need to be implemented, and the sooner the better.  

Early on, we grew fast and I became totally focused on our top-line success and growth rate. But there came a time when it was clear that without strengthening the foundational aspects of our business, it would never grow past a certain point. I had to move myself out of the center of operations and learn to build and run a business like a shareholder, not like the star attraction. Making myself a part of a stronger, more diverse, and younger team of professionals was hard, but very necessary – more than just changing my leadership style, we had to change the culture of our operation and, frankly, that was beyond my skill set. So, we brought in outside help – people who knew things that I didn’t – and that made all the difference. 

Read More

Topics: Business Growth, Business Value, Next Generation, Sustainability, Building Your Team, Enterprise

The Importance of Human Capital – A Founder's Perspective

Posted by David Grau Sr., JD on Aug 1, 2018 10:46:31 AM

Cultivating A Strong Team

Looking back over the past few decades, you can easily spot the trends and physical changes in our industry. Since 2000, when FP Transitions formally opened its doors, I’ve seen our profession, especially in those working under an independent broker-dealer or hybrid model, steadily shift to fee and advice-based solutions. Early on, most practices that we represented were made up primarily of transaction or non-recurring revenue; today advisors build businesses with a focus on fee-based income streams. Independent insurance companies are evolving as well with a sophisticated and wide array of recurring revenue.

Along the way, these practices have become not just more valuable, they are also physically larger and stronger. This requires more qualified people to analyze, give advice, produce revenue, as well as the adjunct talent to support these professionals. Looking forward, we see an ever increasing need to recruit and retain the best talent in the industry to support not just where your practice is today, but where that growing business will be ten years from now. Everyone has read about the need for recruiting; but the story has shifted in the past few years and will continue to do so going forward. Rather than simply hiring next gen talent as the need arises, this could well turn into a fierce competition to adequately reward and retain that talent as more and more advisory businesses reach the next level of success and draw upon a talent pool that has scarcity written all over it. 

Read More

Topics: Business Growth, Enterprise Strength, Next Generation, Building Your Team, Equity Pathways

The Three Pillars of a Successful Advisory Business

Posted by David Grau Sr., JD on May 24, 2018 2:26:19 PM

3pillars_banner

In my work, I’ve become a “professional traveler,” so I spend a lot of time in airports, and I get to talk to many of the pilots. Airline pilots are adventurous souls who enjoy finding ways to go faster, fly higher, and see things from a level that others cannot. They are also very methodical and go about everything with a checklist mentality, a clear purpose, and as much knowledge on the subject matter as they can muster. I find a lot of our entrepreneurial advisors to be cut from the same cloth. The goal of building something bigger, stronger, and better, helping clients with a different view of the financial world, and then sharing what they’ve built with others is woven into the very fabric of their being. Entrepreneurs like to grow, and they like to do things right.

Growth, of course, can mean many things. You might want to grow your top line revenue and assets under management. Maybe you’re looking to hire and build your team in order to improve client experiences. Perhaps you want to acquire a practice–or two–to quickly grow revenue, assets, the client base, and your own income. But, just like a pilot who wants to go faster and fly higher, eventually you’re going to need a larger plane, a stronger engine and airframe, even additional skills that maybe you don’t have–or don’t necessarily have a passion for developing.

Over time, we’ve seen that independent advisors don’t naturally build large, profitable, sustainable businesses. The ambition is there, and recurring, fee-based revenue certainly helps, but the skill-sets that prompt most of you to hang out your own shingle and start gathering clients who entrust you with their financial goals and assets are different than what it takes to run an organization of professionals and create scale. For these reasons and others, this is still more an industry of book builders than it is of business builders.

Read More

Topics: Compensation, Succession Planning, Organizational Structure, Business Growth, Entity Structure, Sustainability, Building Your Team

Your Catalyst for Growth and Progress: Focus on Your Team

Posted by Colleen Jordan Hallinan on Mar 13, 2018 8:40:53 AM

Successful, ambitious, and conscientious advisors ask questions like: How do I create next-level growth? What will it take to build a firm that delivers an extraordinary experience to my clients and their families? How am I going to achieve my own next-level life? 

The answer starts with another strategic question: What has to happen to give you the freedom to focus on precisely those aspirations?

Your catalyst for growth in all three areas lies in the talents of your team. Make your A players your #1 priority and you’ll have an alchemy that expands your available time and transforms exhaustion and obstacles into more space and energy.

A Players

But it doesn’t come without a cost. The cost is personal sacrifice of current habits, beliefs, ego, and behavior, plus an investment of more time now to blend together the ingredients for that alchemy. Your results will come from your ability to:

  • let go and stay focused on the big picture,
  • place yourself in service to your team, and
  • treat them like your best clients.
Read More

Topics: Succession Planning, Business Growth, Next Generation, Sustainability, Building Your Team

Preparing for the Next Tranche in Your Succession Plan

Posted by Kem Taylor on Mar 7, 2018 11:21:00 AM

preparingfortranche2_banner.jpg

Your firm’s succession plan is designed to gradually transition ownership, leadership, and growth responsibilities to the next generation of advisors. The goal is sustainability of the firm, and it is accomplished through a plan that coordinates the changing roles of the founder(s) and the successor team over many years. 

Selling equity in the business in a series of steps or “Tranches” gives both the founder and the next generation of owners the time to wisely manage the transition and to prepare for the changes to come. The transfer of ownership from the founders (G1s), to the second and third generation of owners (G2s and G3s), starts with Tranche 1. Tranche 1 is usually a shift of 10% to 20% of ownership to the next generation. Tranche 1 is often called the incubator stage and allows for all parties to test the waters and to prepare the business structure for the journey ahead.

The second step, Tranche 2, tends to move ownership to 70%/30% or 60%/40%, with G1 retaining the majority ownership position. The tranche system – selling to G2s and eventually G3s – not only widens the ownership base but also provides increasing continuity support as the firm develops and the successor team comes together.

As our clients progress through Tranche 1 we are often asked, “When should we start Tranche 2?” And the answer is: It depends, but also know that Tranche 2 tends to start well before the final payments are made by the G2 owners in Tranche 1.

Read More

Topics: Succession Planning, Business Growth, Next Generation, Building Your Team

Blog Comments